Romans 15:1

“We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations

Wee then that are strong, ought to beare the infirmities of the weake, and not to please our selues.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

Now we who are strong ought to bear the weaknesses of those without strength and not {just} please ourselves.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

Now we that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.
- American Standard Version (1901)

We who are strong have to be a support to the feeble, and not give pleasure to ourselves.
- Basic English Bible

But *we* ought, we that are strong, to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.
- Darby Bible

We then that are strong ought to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves.
- Webster's Bible

As for us who are strong, our duty is to bear with the weaknesses of those who are not strong, and not seek our own pleasure.
- Weymouth Bible

Now we who are strong ought to bear the weaknesses of the weak, and not to please ourselves.
- World English Bible

But we saddere men owen to susteyne the feblenesses of sijke men, and not plese to vs silf.
- Wycliffe Bible

And we ought -- we who are strong -- to bear the infirmities of the weak, and not to please ourselves;
- Youngs Literal Bible

Bible commentary

Wesley's Notes for Romans 15:1


15:1 We who are strong - Of a clearer judgment, and free from these scruples. And not to please ourselves - Without any regard to others.


People's Bible Notes for Romans 15:1


Ro 15:1 Mutual Love and Forbearance Enjoined SUMMARY OF ROMANS 15: The Strong Must Bear with the Weak. Not to Seek to Please Ourselves. Christ Did Not. As Christ Received Us, So We Should Receive Each Other. Christ the Savior of Both Jews and Gentiles. Paul's Apostleship. His Work Among the Gentiles. His Purpose to Visit Rome. We then that are strong. In the last chapter Paul contrasts the strong and the weak. The first are those, like himself, who know that no kind of food "is unclean of itself", and are emancipated from Jewish prejudices. These strong ones are to bear with the "infirmities of the weak", as has been enjoined in the preceding chapter. The lesson is a practical one of all ages.

Discussion for Romans 15:1

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