Mark 12:42

“And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations for Mark 12:42

And there came a certaine poore widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

A poor widow came and put in two small copper coins, which amount to a cent.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

And there came a poor widow, and she cast in two mites, which make a farthing.
- American Standard Version (1901)

And there came a poor widow, and she put in two little bits of money, which make a farthing.
- Basic English Bible

And a poor widow came and cast in two mites, which is a farthing.
- Darby Bible

And there came a certain poor widow, and she threw in two mites, which make a farthing.
- Webster's Bible

But there came one poor widow and dropped in two farthings, equal in value to a halfpenny.
- Weymouth Bible

A poor widow came, and she cast in two small brass coins, which equal a quadrans coin.
- World English Bible

But whanne a pore widewe was comun, sche keste two mynutis, that is, a ferthing.
- Wycliffe Bible

and having come, a poor widow did put in two mites, which are a farthing.
- Youngs Literal Bible

Bible Commentary for Mark 12:42

Wesley's Notes for Mark 12:42


12:41 He beheld how people cast money into the treasury - This treasury received the voluntary contributions of the worshippers who came up to the feast; which were given to buy wood for the altar, and other necessaries not provided for in any other way. #Lu 21:1|.

12:43 I say to you, that this poor widow hath cast in more than they all - See what judgement is cast on the most specious, outward actions by the Judge of all! And how acceptable to him is the smallest, which springs from self - denying love!


People's Bible Notes for Mark 12:42


Mr 12:42 There came a certain poor widow. Here, as in other places in the Bible, we must remember the exceedingly depressed and dependent condition of a poor man's widow in the countries where our Lord was. The expression is almost proverbial for one very badly off, and most unlikely to contribute anything to a charitable purpose. Two mites. The smallest of Jewish coins, about the value of one-fifth of a cent. It took its name from its extreme smallness, being derived from the adjective "lepton", signifying "thin". A farthing. Mark (not Luke) adds for his Roman readers an explanation, using a Greek word, "kodrantes", (taken from the Latin "quadrans"), meaning the fourth part, as our word "farthing" does. The value is only of importance as showing upon how minute a gift our Lord pronounced this splendid panegyric, which might be envied by a Croesus or a Rothschild.

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