Luke 6:41

And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations

And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brothers eye, but perceiuest not the beame that is in thine owne eye?
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

"Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye?
- New American Standard Version (1995)

And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?
- American Standard Version (1901)

And why do you take note of the grain of dust in your brother's eye, but take no note of the bit of wood which is in your eye?
- Basic English Bible

But why lookest thou on the mote which is in the eye of thy brother, but perceivest not the beam which is in thine own eye?
- Darby Bible

And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thy own eye?
- Webster's Bible

And why look at the splinter in your brother's eye instead of giving careful attention to the beam in your own?
- Weymouth Bible

Why do you see the speck of chaff that is in your brother's eye, but don't consider the beam that is in your own eye?
- World English Bible

And what seest thou in thi brotheris iye a moot, but thou biholdist not a beem, that is in thin owne iye?
- Wycliffe Bible

`And why dost thou behold the mote that is in thy brother's eye, and the beam that [is] in thine own eye dost not consider?
- Youngs Literal Bible

Bible commentary

Wesley's Notes for Luke 6:41


6:41 #Mt 7:3|.


People's Bible Notes for Luke 6:41


Lu 6:41,42 The mote that is in thy brother's eye. See notes on Mt 7:3-5.

Discussion for Luke 6:41

  • Rupert Reiger for verse 41
    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but perceivest not the beam that is in thine own eye?

    Leads directly to The categorical imperative.
    The categorical imperative is the central philosophical concept in the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant.

    So Luke 6:41 is identical to
    categorical imperative 2nd formulation:
    "Act in such a way that you treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, always at the same time as an end and never merely as a means to an end"

    Which directly leads to
    categorical imperative 1st formulation:
    "Act only according to that maxim whereby you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law without contradiction."

    Interesting, how this little sentence from Luke 6:41 is directly leading and is the basis of a great philosophy, 1800 years later.

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