Jude 1:7

“Even as Sodom and Gomorrha, and the cities about them in like manner, giving themselves over to fornication, and going after strange flesh, are set forth for an example, suffering the vengeance of eternal fire.”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations for Jude 1:7

Euen as Sodom and Gomorrha, and the cities about them, in like maner giuing themselues ouer to fornication, and going after strange flesh, are set forth for an example, suffring the vengeance of eternall fire.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

just as Sodom and Gomorrah and the cities around them, since they in the same way as these indulged in gross immorality and went after strange flesh, are exhibited as an example in undergoing the punishment of eternal fire.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

Even as Sodom and Gomorrah, and the cities about them, having in like manner with these given themselves over to fornication and gone after strange flesh, are set forth as an example, suffering the punishment of eternal fire.
- American Standard Version (1901)

Even as Sodom and Gomorrah, and the towns near them, having like these, given themselves up to unclean desires and gone after strange flesh, have been made an example, undergoing the punishment of eternal fire.
- Basic English Bible

as Sodom and Gomorrha, and the cities around them, committing greedily fornication, in like manner with them, and going after other flesh, lie there as an example, undergoing the judgment of eternal fire.
- Darby Bible

Even as Sodom and Gomorrah, and the cities about them in like manner, giving themselves over to impurity, and going after strange flesh, are set forth for an example, suffering the vengeance of eternal fire.
- Webster's Bible

So also Sodom and Gomorrah--and the neighboring towns in the same manner--having been guilty of gross fornication and having gone astray in pursuit of unnatural vice, are now before us as a specimen of the fire of the Ages in the punishment which they are undergoing.
- Weymouth Bible

Even as Sodom and Gomorrah, and the cities around them, having, in the same way as these, given themselves over to sexual immorality and gone after strange flesh, are set forth as an example, suffering the punishment of eternal fire.
- World English Bible

As Sodom, and Gomorre, and the nyy coostid citees, that in lijk maner diden fornycacioun, and yeden awei aftir othir fleisch, and ben maad ensaumple, suffrynge peyne of euerelastinge fier.
- Wycliffe Bible

as Sodom and Gomorrah, and the cities around them, in like manner to these, having given themselves to whoredom, and gone after other flesh, have been set before -- an example, of fire age-during, justice suffering.
- Youngs Literal Bible

Bible Commentary for Jude 1:7

Wesley's Notes for Jude 1:7


1:7 The cities which gave themselves over to fornication - The word here means, unnatural lusts. Are set forth as an example, suffering the vengeance of eternal fire - That is, the vengeance which they suffered is an example or a type of eternal fire.


People's Bible Notes for Jude 1:7


Jude 1:7 Even as Sodom and Gomorrha. See notes on 2Pe 2:6,10. For their lasciviousness terrible destruction came upon them. Are set forth for an example. Utterly destroyed by fire they are an example that points to the eternal fire.

Discussion for Jude 1:7

  • Worship on Passover Sunday on Jude 1:7
    Pagan Roots in Some Holidays

    Easter was originally the celebration of Ishtar, the Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility and sex. After Constantine decided to Christianize the Empire, Easter was changed to represent Jesus. But at its roots, Easter (which is how you pronounce Ishtar) is all about celebrating fertility and sex.

    Ishtar(ProperNoun) A goddess of fertility, love, sex and war. In the Babylonian pantheon, she was the divine personification of the planet Venus. Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte.

    Pagan goddess of Easter

    "Eostre"

    But in English-speaking countries, and in Germany, Easter takes its name from a pagan goddess from Anglo-Saxon England who was described in a book by the eighth-century English monk Bede. "Eostre was a goddess of spring or renewal and that's why her feast is attached to the vernal equinox."

    Passover is the Christian Holiday we Worship. Has nothing to do with the pagan Holiday of Easter.

    The word "Easter" (or its equivalents) appear in the Bible only once in Acts 12:4. This passage refers to Herod killing John, the brother of James. Peter was to be next, so Peter was put in prison until after the pagan holiday of Easter (for Jews & Christians, the Passover). That's the night the Angel of the Lord broke Peter out of prison! Hallelujah!

    Mishael
  • Ilya on Jude 1:7
    What strange flesh means? Is it race-mixing or bestiality or homosexuality?
  • Tonyp - in Reply on Jude 1:7
    I felt that it was refering to homosexuality and beastality because it was talking about sodom and gomora and the actions of people there.


 

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