Genesis 45:6

“For these two years hath the famine been in the land: and yet there are five years, in the which there shall neither be earing nor harvest.”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations for Genesis 45:6

For these two yeeres hath the famine bene in the land: and yet there are fiue yeeres, in the which there shall neither be earing nor haruest.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

"For the famine {has been} in the land these two years, and there are still five years in which there will be neither plowing nor harvesting.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

For these two years hath the famine been in the land: and there are yet five years, in which there shall be neither plowing nor harvest.
- American Standard Version (1901)

For these two years have been years of need, and there are still five more years to come in which there will be no ploughing or cutting of grain.
- Basic English Bible

For the famine has been these two years in the land; and yet there are five years in which there will be neither ploughing nor harvest.
- Darby Bible

For these two years hath the famine been in the land: and yet there are five years, in which there shall neither be tillage nor harvest.
- Webster's Bible

For these two years the famine has been in the land, and there are yet five years, in which there will be neither plowing nor harvest.
- World English Bible

`Because these two years the famine [is] in the heart of the land, and yet [are] five years, [in] which there is neither ploughing nor harvest;
- Youngs Literal Bible

For these two years hath the famine been in the land; and there are yet five years, in which there shall be neither plowing nor harvest.
- Jewish Publication Society Bible

Bible Commentary for Genesis 45:6

Wesley's Notes for Genesis 45:6


45:5 Be not grieved or angry with yourselves - Sinners must grieve, and be angry with themselves for their sins; yea, though God, by his power, bring good out of them, for that is no thanks to the sinner: but true penitents should be greatly affected with it, when they see God bringing good out of evil. Though we must not with this consideration extenuate our own sins, and so take off the edge of our repentance; yet it may do well thus to extenuate the sins of others, and so take off the edge of our angry resentments. Thus Joseph doth here. His brethren needed not to fear that he would revenge upon them an injury which God's providence had made to turn so much to his advantage, and that of his family. Now he tells them how long the famine was likely to last, five years yet, #Ge 45:6|, and what a capacity he was in of being kind to his relations, which is the greatest satisfaction that wealth and power can give to a good man.

45:8 See what a favourable colour he puts upon the injury they had done him, God sent me before you - God's Israel is the particular care of God's providence. Joseph reckoned that his advancement was not so much designed to save a whole kingdom of Egyptians, as to preserve a small family of Israelites; for the Lord's portion is his people: whatever goes with others, they shall be secured. How admirable are the projects of Providence! How remote its tendencies! What wheels are there within wheels; and yet all directed by the eyes in the wheels, and the Spirit of the living Creature! [5.] He promises to take care of his father and all his family, during the rest of the years of famine. [1.] He desires that his father might speedily be made glad with the tidings of his life and honour. His brethren must hasten to Canaan, and acquaint Jacob that his son Joseph was lord of all Egypt - He knew it would be a refreshing oil to his hoary head, and a sovereign cordial to his spirits. He desires them to give themselves, and take with them to their father, all possible satisfaction of the truth of these surprising tidings.


Discussion for Genesis 45:6



 

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