Genesis 4:6

“And the LORD said unto Cain, Why art thou wroth? and why is thy countenance fallen?”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations for Genesis 4:6

And the LORD said vnto Cain, Why art thou wroth? And why is thy countenance fallen?
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

Then the LORD said to Cain, "Why are you angry? And why has your countenance fallen?
- New American Standard Version (1995)

And Jehovah said unto Cain, Why art thou wroth? and why is thy countenance fallen?
- American Standard Version (1901)

And the Lord said to Cain, Why are you angry? and why is your face sad?
- Basic English Bible

And Jehovah said to Cain, Why art thou angry, and why is thy countenance fallen?
- Darby Bible

And the LORD said to Cain, Why art thou wroth? and why is thy countenance fallen?
- Webster's Bible

Yahweh said to Cain, "Why are you angry? Why has the expression of your face fallen?
- World English Bible

And Jehovah saith unto Cain, `Why hast thou displeasure? and why hath thy countenance fallen?
- Youngs Literal Bible

And the LORD said unto Cain: 'Why art thou wroth? and why is thy countenance fallen?
- Jewish Publication Society Bible

Bible Commentary for Genesis 4:6

Wesley's Notes for Genesis 4:6


4:4 And the Lord God had respect to Abel and to his offering, and shewed his acceptance of it, probably by fire from heaven but to Cain and to his offering he had not respect. We are sure there was a good reason for this difference: that Governor of the world, though an absolute sovereign, doth not act arbitrarily in dispensing his smiles and frowns. There was a difference in the characters of the persons offering: Cain was a wicked man, but Abel was a righteous man, #Mt 23:35|. There was a difference in the offerings they brought. Abel's was a more excellent sacrifice than Cain's; Cain's was only a sacrifice of acknowledgment offered to the Creator; the meat - offerings of the fruit of the ground were no more: but Abel brought a sacrifice of atonement, the blood whereof was shed in order to remission, thereby owning himself a sinner, deprecating God's wrath, and imploring his favour in a Mediator. But the great difference was, Abel offered in faith, and Cain did not. Abel offered with an eye to God's will as his rule, and in dependence upon the promise of a Redeemer. But Cain did not offer in faith, and so it turned into sin to him.

4:5 And Cain was wroth, and his countenance fell - Not so much out of grief as malice and rage. His sullen churlish countenance, and down - look, betrayed his passionate resentment.

4:7 If thou dost well, shalt thou not be accepted? - Either, 1. If thou hadst done well, as thy brother did, thou shouldest have been accepted as he was. God is no respecter of persons; so that if we come short of acceptance with him, the fault is wholly our own. This will justify God in the destruction of sinners, and will aggravate their ruin. There is not a damned sinner in hell, but if he had done well, as he might have done, had been a glorified saint in heaven. Every mouth will shortly be stopt with this. Or, 2. If now thou do well: if thou repent of thy sin, reform thy heart and life, and bring thy sacrifice in a better manner; thou shalt yet be accepted. See how early the gospel was preached, and the benefit of it here offered even to one of the chief of sinners. He sets before him death and a curse; but, if not well - Seeing thou didst not do well, not offer in faith, and in a right manner, sin lieth at the door - That is, sin only hinders thy acceptance. All this considered, Cain had no reason to he angry with his brother, but at himself only. Unto thee shall be his desire - He shall continue in respect to thee as an elder brother, and thou, as the first - born, shall rule over him as much as ever. God's acceptance of Abel's offering did not transfer the birth - right to him, (which Cain was jealous of) nor put upon him that dignity, and power, which is said to belong to it, #Gen 49:3|.

4:8 And Cain talked with Abel his brother - The Chaldee paraphrast adds, that Cain, when they were in discourse, maintained there was no judgment to come, and that when Abel spoke in defence of the truth, Cain took that occasion to fall upon him. The scripture tells us the reason wherefore he slew him, because his own works were evil, and his brother's righteous; so that herein he shewed himself to be a child of the devil, as being an enemy to all righteousness. Observe, the first that dies is a saint, the first that went to the grave, went to heaven. God would secure to himself the first fruits, the first born to the dead, that first opened the womb into another world.


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