Genesis 31:17

“Then Jacob rose up, and set his sons and his wives upon camels;”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations for Genesis 31:17

Then Iacob rose vp, and set his sonnes and his wiues vpon camels.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

Then Jacob arose and put his children and his wives upon camels;
- New American Standard Version (1995)

Then Jacob rose up, and set his sons and his wives upon the camels;
- American Standard Version (1901)

Then Jacob put his wives and his sons on camels;
- Basic English Bible

And Jacob rose up, and set his sons and his wives upon camels,
- Darby Bible

Then Jacob arose, and set his sons and his wives upon camels;
- Webster's Bible

Then Jacob rose up, and set his sons and his wives on the camels,
- World English Bible

And Jacob riseth, and lifteth up his sons and his wives on the camels,
- Youngs Literal Bible

Then Jacob rose up, and set his sons and his wives upon the camels;
- Jewish Publication Society Bible

Bible Commentary for Genesis 31:17

Wesley's Notes for Genesis 31:17


31:16 Whereas Jacob looked upon the wealth which God had passed over from Laban to him as his wages, they look upon it as their portions; so that both ways God forced Laban to pay his debts, both to his servant and to his daughters.

31:19 Laban went to shear his sheep - That part of his flock which was in the hands of his sons, three days journey off. Now, It is certain it was lawful for Jacob to leave his service suddenly: it was not only justified by the particular instructions God gave him, but warranted by the fundamental law of self - preservation which directs us, when we are in danger, to shift for our own safety, as far as we can do it without wronging our consciences. It was his prudence to steal away unawares to Laban, lest if Laban had known, he should have hindered him, or plundered him. It was honestly done to take no more than his own with him, the cattle of his getting. He took what providence gave him, and would not take the repair of his damages into his own hands. Yet Rachel was not so honest as her husband; she stole her father's images, and carried them away. The Hebrew calls them Teraphim. Some think they were only little representations of the ancestors of the family in statue or picture, which Rachel had a particular fondness for, and was desirous to have with her now she was going into another country. It should rather seem they were images for a religious use, penates, household gods, either worshipped, or consulted as oracles; and we are willing to hope, that she took them away, not out of covetousness much less for her own use, or out of any superstitious fear lest Laban, by consulting his teraphim, might know which way they were gone; (Jacob no doubt dwelt with his wives as a man of knowledge, and they were better taught than so) but with a design to convince her father of the folly of his regard to those as gods which could not secure themselves.


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