Ecclesiastes 6:9

“Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this is also vanity and vexation of spirit.”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations

Better is the sight of the eyes, then the wandering of the desire: this is also vanitie and vexation of spirit.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

What the eyes see is better than what the soul desires. This too is futility and a striving after wind.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this also is vanity and a striving after wind.
- American Standard Version (1901)

What the eyes see is better than the wandering of desire. This is to no purpose and a desire for wind.
- Basic English Bible

Better is the seeing of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this also is vanity and pursuit of the wind.
- Darby Bible

Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire: this is also vanity and vexation of spirit.
- Webster's Bible

Better is the sight of the eyes than the wandering of the desire. This also is vanity and a chasing after wind.
- World English Bible

Better [is] the sight of the eyes than the going of the soul. This also [is] vanity and vexation of spirit.
- Youngs Literal Bible

Better is the seeing of the eyes than the wandering of the desire; this also is vanity and a striving after wind.
- Jewish Publication Society Bible

Bible commentary

Wesley's Notes for Ecclesiastes 6:9


6:9 The fight - The comfortable enjoyment of what a man hath. Than - Restless desires of what a man hath not. This - Wandering of the desire.


Discussion for Ecclesiastes 6

  • Irene123
    Truly wise people who happen to be rich - are very seldom - joyful. To keep their wealth they have lots of 'concerns', and it's HARD to trust people with their business, embezzlers, bad advice, etc. Oh, they can laugh at a party, but it's not in their eyes. Earthly riches does not bring happiness. Many of their children die from drugs, and other bad judgment.
  • Irene123
    Delores - Solomon began good, but because he was blessed of God, above all men, in wisdom 'n riches - he gradually turned from God. He was lifted up in pride. His many women turned him to idol worship; he sacrificed children (pass through the fire) to the idols of Chemosh, Molech, etc - in the 'high places'. 1 Kgs. 3:3; 11:10; Deut.17:14-20. No, he never repented or God's word would say so.
  • Delores Harrison
    Solomon had riches and wisdom. He had it all. Why did he allow women to make him lose his soul.? Or did he?
  • Searcher



    Dear Kabarie,,

    The best interpretation I can put on this verse is that if a man works hard and overcomes adversity to create benefits for himself and his successors, what he creates, including monetary wealth, should be available to him to enjoy, not to some other person who has done nothing towards the creation of the benefits, e.g., immigrants ('strangers').
  • Irene123
    To Joel 4 mos. ago -read 1 Kgs. ch.11 .....? This will explain his depression.
  • Noe
    This book in the Bible teaches one how to live, think, speak, act...in God's perfect wisdom, not human errored and sin-filled way of living. Praise almighty Jesus.

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