Bible Discussion Thread

 
  • Richard H Priday on Psalms 5
    This is the first of a number of "impreccatory" Psalms. The conundrum in the minds of some today is that desiring our enemies to be destroyed somehow is contradicting the N.T. sayings of Christ to "love our enemies". We should see; however that in the GENERAL case of the fate of the wicked such sentiments (if I can use that word) toward the Pharisees were; shall we say not exactly "politially correct" at best; and led to most if not all of the TEN attempts on the life of Christ before the crucifixion. We should look at it in terms of the final fate of the unredeemed as Revelation states in chapter 21; verse 27 nothing "unclean" enters the holy city. This is fairly close to the reaction toward those in hell as seen at the end of Isaiah 66.

    God surely gets no "pleasure in the death of the wicked". ( Ezekiel 18:32). To understand David correctly we must see it as the Holy Spirit and inspired scripture; although there were those enemies of his that he wanted to see eliminated. It wasn't for the sake of a personal vendetta; as can be seen by his patience with the "anointed of the Lord" ( 1 Samuel 24:6). Even when his own sin took Saul; David mourned over his death. We can look at Judas Iscariot and the prophecy ( Psalm 41:9). This was a man deliberately chosen and called who was predestined to be the son of perdition. Nonetheless; giving him the sop was said to be something honoring a person right before Satan entered him and he went off to betray him. (see John 13:29). Loving our enemies therefore is personal; whereas our attitude toward destruction is impersonal. Only God can make the personal judgment; and tdhat is impartial.

    Therefore; the general message is the blessing of rightous (verse 11 and 12) and the destruction of the wicked because of their sins making them deserving of such a fate.


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