Acts 17:22

“Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars' hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations

Then Paul stood in the mids of Mars-hill, and said, Yee men of Athens, I perceiue that in all things yee are too superstitious.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

So Paul stood in the midst of the Areopagus and said, "Men of Athens, I observe that you are very religious in all respects.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

And Paul stood in the midst of the Areopagus, and said, Ye men of Athens, in all things, I perceive that ye are very religious.
- American Standard Version (1901)

And Paul got to his feet on Mars' Hill and said, O men of Athens, I see that you are overmuch given to fear of the gods.
- Basic English Bible

And Paul standing in the midst of Areopagus said, Athenians, in every way I see you given up to demon worship;
- Darby Bible

Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars-hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.
- Webster's Bible

So Paul, taking his stand in the centre of the Areopagus, spoke as follows: "Men of Athens, I perceive that you are in every respect remarkably religious.
- Weymouth Bible

Paul stood in the middle of the Areopagus, and said, "You men of Athens, I perceive that you are very religious in all things.
- World English Bible

And Poul stood in the myddil of Ariopage, and seide, Men of Athenys, bi alle thingis Y se you as veyn worschipers.
- Wycliffe Bible

And Paul, having stood in the midst of the Areopagus, said, `Men, Athenians, in all things I perceive you as over-religious;
- Youngs Literal Bible

Bible commentary

Wesley's Notes for Acts 17:22


17:22 Then Paul standing in the midst of the Areopagus - An ample theatre; said - Giving them a lecture of natural divinity, with admirable wisdom, acuteness, fulness, and courtesy. They inquire after new things: Paul in his divinely philosophical discourse, begins with the first, and goes on to the last things, both which were new things to them. He points out the origin and the end of all things, concerning which they had so many disputes, and equally refutes both the Epicurean and Stoic. I perceive - With what clearness and freedom does he speak! Paul against Athens!


People's Bible Notes for Acts 17:22


Ac 17:22 Paul stood in the midst of Mars' hill. In the Areopagus. Let the reader keep in mind that this address was spoken in the literary capital of the ancient world, the most cultured city of the earth to which every Roman who sought a finished education resorted to complete his studies, the home of philosophers, orators, sculptors, painters and poets, and the great university where many thousands of strangers were gathered for study. This ancient city of so glorious history is the modern capital of Greece, and has about 100,000 inhabitants. [Ye] men of Athens. The introduction of Paul has always been regarded as a masterpiece of skill. He does not say, In all things ye are too superstitious, but that "ye are very religious" (Revised Version), or ye are "more religious than others". His remark is a compliment, and he confirms it by a statement that he had found an altar "to the unknown God" (Ac 17:23).

Discussion for Acts 17:22

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