1 Samuel 29:5

Is not this David, of whom they sang one to another in dances, saying, Saul slew his thousands, and David his ten thousands?”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations for 1 Samuel 29:5

Is not this Dauid, of whom they sang one to another in daunces, saying, Saul slew his thousands, and Dauid his ten thousands?
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

"Is this not David, of whom they sing in the dances, saying, 'Saul has slain his thousands, And David his ten thousands'?"
- New American Standard Version (1995)

Is not this David, of whom they sang one to another in dances, saying, Saul hath slain his thousands, And David his ten thousands?
- American Standard Version (1901)

Is this not David, who was named in their songs, when in the dance they said to one another, Saul has put to death thousands, and David tens of thousands?
- Basic English Bible

Is not this David, of whom they sang one to another in dances, saying, Saul smote his thousands, and David his ten thousands?
- Darby Bible

Is not this David, of whom they sung one to another in dances, saying, Saul slew his thousands, and David his ten thousands?
- Webster's Bible

Is not this David, of whom they sang one to another in dances, saying, 'Saul has slain his thousands, David his ten thousands?'"
- World English Bible

Is not this David, of whom they answer in choruses, saying, Saul hath smitten among his thousands, and David among his myriads?'
- Youngs Literal Bible

Is not this David, of whom they sang one to another in dances, saying: Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands?'
- Jewish Publication Society Bible

Bible Commentary for 1 Samuel 29:5

Wesley's Notes for 1 Samuel 29:5


29:3 The princes - The Lords of the other eminent cities, who were confederate with him in this expedition. These days or years - That is, did I say days? I might have said years. He hath now been with me a full year and four months, chap.#27:7|, and he was with me some years ago, #1Sam 21:10|, and since their time hath been known to me. And it is not improbable, but David, after his escape from thence, might hold some correspondence with Achish, as finding him to be a man of a more generous temper than the rest of the Philistines, and supposing that he might have need of him for a refuge, in case Saul continued to seek his life. Since he fell - Revolted, or left his own king to turn to me.

29:4 Make this fellow - Herein the wise and gracious providence of God appeared, both in helping him out of these difficulties, out of which no human wit could have extricated him, but he must have been, an ungrateful person either to the one or the other side, and moreover in giving him the happy opportunity of recovering his own, and his all from the Amalekites, which had been irrecoverably lost, if he had gone into this battle. And the kindness of God to David was the greater, because it had been most just for God to have left David in those distresses into which his own sinful counsel had brought him. These men - That is, of these our soldiers, they speak according to the rules of true policy; for by this very course, great enemies have sometimes been reconciled together.


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