Revelation 1:3

“Blessed is he that readeth, and they that hear the words of this prophecy, and keep those things which are written therein: for the time is at hand.”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations

Blessed is hee that readeth, and they that heare the words of this prophesie, and keepe those things which are written therein: for the time is at hand.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

Blessed is he who reads and those who hear the words of the prophecy, and heed the things which are written in it; for the time is near.
- New American Standard Version (1995)

Blessed is he that readeth, and they that hear the words of the prophecy, and keep the things that are written therein: for the time is at hand.
- American Standard Version (1901)

A blessing be on the reader, and on those who give ear to the prophet's words, and keep the things which he has put in the book: for the time is near.
- Basic English Bible

Blessed [is] he that reads, and they that hear the words of the prophecy, and keep the things written in it; for the time [is] near.
- Darby Bible

Blessed is he that readeth, and they that hear the words of this prophecy, and keep those things which are written therein: for the time is at hand.
- Webster's Bible

Blessed is he who reads and blessed are those who listen to the words of this prophecy and lay to heart what is written in it; for the time for its fulfillment is now close at hand.
- Weymouth Bible

Blessed is he who reads and those who hear the words of the prophecy, and keep the things that are written in it, for the time is at hand.
- World English Bible

Blessid is he that redith, and he that herith the wordis of this prophecie, and kepith tho thingis that ben writun in it; for the tyme is niy.
- Wycliffe Bible

Happy is he who is reading, and those hearing, the words of the prophecy, and keeping the things written in it -- for the time is nigh!
- Youngs Literal Bible

Bible commentary

Wesley's Notes for Revelation 1:3

1:3 Happy is he that readeth, and they that hear, the words of this prophecy - Some have miserably handled this book. Hence others are afraid to touch it; and, while they desire to know all things else, reject only the knowledge of those which God hath shown. They inquire after anything rather than this; as if it were written, Happy is he that doth not read this prophecy. Nay, but happy is he that readeth, and they that hear, and keep the words thereof - Especially at this time, when so considerable a part of them is on the point of being fulfilled. Nor are helps wanting whereby any sincere and diligent inquirer may understand what he reads therein. The book itself is written in the most accurate manner possible. It distinguishes the several things whereof it treats by seven epistles, seven seals, seven trumpets, seven phials; each of which sevens is divided into four and three. Many things the book itself explains; as the seven stars; the seven candlesticks; the lamb, his seven horns and seven eyes; the incense; the dragon; the heads and horns of the beasts; the fine linen; the testimony of Jesus: and much light arises from comparing it with the ancient prophecies, and the predictions in the other books of the New Testament. In this book our Lord has comprised what was wanting in those prophecies touching the time which followed his ascension and the end of the Jewish polity. Accordingly, it reaches from the old Jerusalem to the new, reducing all things into one sum, in the exactest order, and with a near resemblance to the ancient prophets. The introduction and conclusion agree with Daniel; the description of the man child, and the promises to Sion, with Isaiah; the judgment of Babylon, with Jeremiah; again, the determination of times, with Daniel; the architecture of the holy city, with Ezekiel; the emblems of the horses, candlesticks, &c., with Zechariah. Many things largely described by the prophets are here summarily repeated; and frequently in the same words. To them we may then usefully have recourse. Yet the Revelation suffices for the explaining itself, even if we do not yet understand those prophecies; yea, it casts much light upon them. Frequently, likewise, where there is a resemblance between them, there is a difference also; the Revelation, as it were, taking a stock from one of the old prophets, and inserting a new graft into it. Thus Zechariah speaks of two olive trees; and so does St. John; but with a different meaning. Daniel has a beast with ten horns; so has St. John; but not with quite the same signification. And here the difference of words, emblems, things, times, ought studiously to be observed. Our Lord foretold many things before his passion; but not all things; for it was not yet seasonable. Many things, likewise, his Spirit foretold in the writings of the apostles, so far as the necessities of those times required: now he comprises them all in one short book; therein presupposing all the other prophecies, and at the same time explaining, continuing, and perfecting them in one thread. It is right therefore to compare them; but not to measure the fulness of these by the scantiness of those preceding. Christ, when on earth, foretold what would come to pass in a short time; adding a brief description of the last things. Here he foretells the intermediate things; so that both put together constitute one complete chain of prophecy. This book is therefore not only the sum and the key of all the prophecies which preceded, but likewise a supplement to all; the seals being closed before. Of consequence, it contains many particulars not revealed in any other part of scripture. They have therefore little gratitude to God for such a revelation, reserved for the exaltation of Christ, who boldly reject whatever they find here which was not revealed, or not so clearly, in other parts of scripture. He that readeth and they that hear - St. John probably sent this book by a single person into Asia, who read it in the churches, while many heard. But this, likewise, in a secondary sense, refers to all that shall duly read or hear it in all ages. The words of this prophecy - It is a revelation with regard to Christ who gives it; a prophecy, with regard to John who delivers it to the churches. And keep the things which are written therein - In such a manner as the nature of them requires; namely, with repentance, faith, patience, prayer, obedience, watchfulness, constancy. It behoves every Christian, at all opportunities, to read what is written in the oracles of God; and to read this precious book in particular, frequently, reverently, and attentively. For the time - Of its beginning to be accomplished. Is near - Even when St. John wrote. How much nearer to us is even the full accomplishment of this weighty prophecy!

People's Bible Notes for Revelation 1:3

Re 1:3 Blessed [is] he that readeth. There is a reference to the custom that had already grown up, at the close of the first century, of reading the apostolic writings publicly in the churches. The benediction is pronounced on the public reader; on those that "hear", and lastly upon those that "keep" the words contained in this prophecy. The time [is] at hand. The period to which the prophecy relates is near.

Discussion for Revelation 1

  • Justina
    Is the act of disclosing divine Manifestation
  • DimBulb
    The Trucker John 3:16 comment was concerning the Commentary on the book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ, not Revelation Chapter 1. Made his point but seemed a little harsh.
  • Helgaardt mouton
    It is the introduction to the Revelation of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the seven church ages and the seven spirits, the seven church ages starting from apostel Paul in the new testament the firt mesesanger to the first church age! So Jesus Christ build His Gentile chuch through seven church ages with seven mesengers till this very day we are now living in the seventh Laodician church age!
  • Karl
    open question; anybody else scratch their head after reading this book? The initial message to the churches timeless and easily applicable. The celestial/terrestrial events are plain enough, the visionary portion is understandable, and even the final combination of both is somewhat discernable. My problem is arises when I try to reconcile all three into one cohesive prophecy. Any insights?
  • Word
    Those are angels that are messengers of God who watch over and report to God on what churches are teaching and at this time and our generation i chose from what I've seen and walked into to check out there are still teaching milk with no meat and a lot of family stories so you never learn much from them but traditions of men.
  • Rose
    Jesus is revealing to John his majesty and glory and power. He is about to give to John instructions to the seven different churches and to the "angels" (pastors) of those churches. Many of the churches of today are like the ones in that time. Some hot, some cold, some lukewarm (the worst kind).

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