Philemon 1:18

“If he hath wronged thee, or oweth thee ought, put that on mine account;”

King James Version (KJV)

Other Translations

If hee hath wronged thee, or oweth thee ought, put that on mine account.
- King James Version (1611) - View 1611 Bible Scan

But if he has wronged you in any way or owes you anything, charge that to my account;
- New American Standard Version (1995)

But if he hath wronged the at all, or oweth `thee' aught, put that to mine account;
- American Standard Version (1901)

If he has done you any wrong or is in debt to you for anything, put it to my account.
- Basic English Bible

but if he have wronged thee anything or owe anything [to thee], put this to my account.
- Darby Bible

If he hath wronged thee, or oweth thee aught, put that on my account;
- Webster's Bible

And if he was ever dishonest or is in your debt, debit me with the amount.
- Weymouth Bible

But if he has wronged you at all, or owes you anything, put that to my account.
- World English Bible

ethir owith, arette thou this thing to me.
- Wycliffe Bible

and if he did hurt to thee, or doth owe anything, this to me be reckoning;
- Youngs Literal Bible

Bible commentary

People's Bible Notes for Philemon 1:18

Phm 1:18 If he hath wronged thee. By defrauding thee of his service. Or oweth [thee] ought. Some have seen in this a suggestion that Onesimus had robbed Philemon, but that inference is not necessary. On the gospel and slavery, see topic 9254.

Discussion for Philemon 1

  • BSP
    Paul was encouraging Philemon to show forgiveness and was even willing to take the blame for Onesimus so that peace could be restored.
  • Steve Harmon
    Ann Braun Paul is saying he is his Spiritual father, he led him to the Lord. In bonds means he led him to the Lord while he was in prison. He also calls Timothy his son which we know he was a teen when Paul met him. Paul helped teach him in the things of God.

  • Terri
    Anne, bond does not mean from one's bowels.
  • Breeze
    I think shows a great lesson. From how I read the chapter, I think Philemon had no problem receiving his servant back. It makes me wonder if he had been praying for Onesimus to meet someone to lead him to the Lord. How wonderful that the Lord reconnected them through a mutual friend. I hope to have my own Onesimus testimony one day with a long-lost friend.
  • Joe
    Anne - What I understand is that Onesimus was a slave who belonged to Philemon and that Philemon was a believer who loved both God and the saints. At some point Onesimus ran away to Rome, heard the word of God, and became a believer. Paul calls Onesimus his son because of their common bond, Jesus Christ.
  • Anne Braun
    You all have confused me in interpreting words that Paul did not say. Paul refers to Onesimus as his son. There is no mistaking this: 10 "I beseech thee for my son Onesimus whom I have begotten in my bonds." 12 "....that is, mine own bowels." Nowhere am I reading in this chapter that Onesimus was Paul's slave, but was his SON. Acting as ones servant is entirely different. It sounds to me as if Paul begot a son while he was in bondage, this son at some point ran away, or left the fold so to speak, now he has returned a changed person and Paul is asking now that he is aged, elderly , that Onesimus be received as if he were Paul himself. How are you all interpreting the situation to be different other than what Paul said? Explain?

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